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The company will offer its service for $48,000 through a physician, and will conduct the sequencing at its newly CLIA-certified laboratory in San Diego. Illumina has teamed up with 23andMe, Navigenics, Decode Genetics, and Knome to interpret the data.

In launching its personal genome service today here at the Consumer Genetics conference, Illumina announced that it will charge $48,000 to analyze patients DNA by whole-genome sequencing. Customers can then sign up with DTC genomic testing partners to get more information on how their genes tie in with medical outcomes.

Unlike most DTC genomic-firms, which allow customers to order gene scans over the Internet and receive sample collection kits in the mail, Illumina’s service will require a prescription from their doctor or from a physician in its Personal Genome Network.

IP Update: Apr 30, 2009

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USPTO Publishes One Patent, Seven Patent Applications Related to RNAi

Snippets: Apr 29, 2009

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MDS Pharma Services, Compendia Bioscience, CombiMatrix, Decode Genetics

The Nasdaq Listing and Hearing Review Council called for a review of an April 22 determination of the Nasdaq Listing Qualifications Panel that it would have delisted Decode's shares on April 30.

Celera plans to use the SNPs to develop personalized risk tests for heart attack, stroke, and type 2 diabetes.

At a March meeting with industry groups, the FDA gathered comments regarding the barriers to drug/diagnostic codevelopment and noted the agency might issue a series of white papers on the topic.

The industry standards issued last December by 23andMe, Decode, and Navigenics are "a good start, but they are really not where they need to be," said Muin Khoury, director of the CDC's Office of Public Health Genomics.

Citing the FDA's handling of KRAS testing for anti-EGFR monoclonal antibodies, the report asserts that in the near term complex genetic tests such as Oncotype DX should be "performed through CLIA labs, and not held up by slow regulatory processes."

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A letter criticizing actions by the US government and research institutions toward Chinese and Chinese-American scientists has garnered more than a hundred signatories.

NPR reports that researchers in New York are investigating whether it is possible to edit the genomes of human sperm.

In an opinion piece at the Nation, Sarah Lawrence College's Laura Hercher argues that everyone should be able to access prenatal genetic testing.

In Nature this week: ancient DNA uncovers presence of Mediterranean migrants at a Himalayan lake, and more.