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A US federal district court in Utah denied Myriad Genetics and other plaintiffs a preliminary junction that would have stopped Ambry Genetics from selling competing BRCA tests, even though the court determined this may harm Myriad's business.

NEW YORK (GenomeWeb News) – A US federal district court has denied Myriad Genetics and other patent holders' request for a preliminary injunction against competitor Ambry Genetics to stop it from performing and selling tests that gauge BRCA genetic mutations.

NEW YORK (GenomeWeb News) – Myriad Genetics and other parties are suing BioReference Laboratories' GeneDx alleging infringement of patents covering BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes.

Myriad Genetics last week launched its next-generation sequencing-based hereditary cancer panel to early-access users.

In the wake of the US Supreme Court's decision to strike down Myriad Genetics' patents on isolated BRCA1 and BRCA2 gene sequences, GeneDx this week become the latest laboratory to launch sequencing-based tests for inherited cancer that include those genes.

This article has been updated from a previous version that stated incorrectly that Gene by Gene has performed 1 million BRCA tests globally.

After being sued by Myriad Genetics for allegedly infringing its patents on BRCA1 and BRCA2 gene mutation testing, Ambry Genetics pushed back this week with its own countersuit accusing Myriad of antitrust violations.

NEW YORK (GenomeWeb News) – In response to Myriad Genetics' patent infringement lawsuit against Ambry Genetics, the Aliso Viejo, Calif.-based testing firm took its own legal action today by countersuing Myriad for antitrust violations.

Ever since the Supreme Court struck down Myriad Genetics' patent claims on isolated BRCA1 and BRCA2 gene sequences, industry observers have breathlessly speculated whether the company would take legal action against labs challenging its decades-long reign over the BRCA genetic te

This article has been updated to include a response from Ambry.

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A letter criticizing actions by the US government and research institutions toward Chinese and Chinese-American scientists has garnered more than a hundred signatories.

NPR reports that researchers in New York are investigating whether it is possible to edit the genomes of human sperm.

In an opinion piece at the Nation, Sarah Lawrence College's Laura Hercher argues that everyone should be able to access prenatal genetic testing.

In Nature this week: ancient DNA uncovers presence of Mediterranean migrants at a Himalayan lake, and more.