Ambry

Konica Minolta paid $800 million up front for Ambry, with Ambry shareholders eligible to receive up to $200 million in future payments.

The deal will join the AmbryPort 2.0 clinical ordering platform with FDNA's Face2Gene next-generation phenotyping application suite.

Ambry will provide genetic testing in NorthShore’s Genomic Health Initiative in hopes of moving precision medicine into clinical practice.

The company expects the deal will help it launch an immunostaining technology, expand into US pharma services, and establish itself as a genetic testing leader in Japan.

Konica said that the deal represents its first step toward building a presence in the precision medicine field, with an eye toward Japan and then Europe.

Through prospective pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma testing, researchers saw germline mutations in new genes and in cases outside of current germline testing criteria.

At the ACMG annual conference in Phoenix last week, several labs and companies discussed their efforts in healthy genome sequencing.

The study, which evaluated data from 65,000 women on 21 genes, identified new risk genes and those that confer no risk, and the findings may have clinical implications.

The research team's data demonstrated that Sanger confirmation is necessary to provide accurate NGS test results to patients.

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Rare gene mutations are guiding the search for drugs to manage chronic pain without opioids, according to CNBC.

The new Francis Crick Institute building can get too noisy for some researchers to concentrate, according to the Guardian.

CBS News reports that there are still many vacancies at the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy, but that it's uncertain whether they will be filled.

In Nucleic Acids Research this week: pipeline to analyze and visualize bacterial genomes, database of global set of human genomes, and more.