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Collaborators have created an atlas that compares available PD-L1 IHC assays and reveals areas of debate, including challenges encountered by clinicians.

At the German Society of Human Genetics annual meeting in Bochum, Berlin's Atlas Biolabs talked about its first experience with the Clarigo test.

A brief recap of Genetics/Genomics news the week of Mar 17, 2017: BGI, Agilent Technologies, ReadCoor, and GeneNews

The Thermo Fisher subsidiary is not liable to Promega in the US for selling infringing forensic DNA kits in Europe, containing US-manufactured Taq polymerase.

The firm's growth in China and pharmaceutical end markets help it beat the Wall Street estimate for revenue and EPS, despite currency headwinds.

Researchers at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory are among those pushing ion mobility spectrometry as a tool to boost complex biological sample analysis.

The European Commission has now approved the anti-PD-1 therapy Keytruda, and the Dako test with it, as a first-line treatment for non-small cell lung cancer.

Agilent filed a lawsuit against Twist nearly a year ago, alleging that Twist Cofounder and CEO Emily LeProust had stolen DNA oligonucleotide synthesis technology. 

The bank rated companies like Thermo Fisher Scientific and Agilent at Buy, Illumina and PerkinElmer at Hold, and Myriad Genetics and Luminex at Sell.

The collaborators will explore the use of cell-free DNA for preimplantation genetic testing. 

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A new study finds that three dimensional facial scans may be able to aid in diagnosing rare genetic diseases.

The Lancet and the New England Journal of Medicine have retracted two COVID-19 papers due to concerns about the data used in their analyses.

Lawmakers plan to introduce a bill that aims to prevent the theft of US-funded research, according to the Wall Street Journal.

In Science this week: analysis of ancient Caribbean islanders' genomes suggests at least three waves of migration into the region,  DNA barcoding of microbial spores, and more.