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A brief recap of Genetics/Genomics news the week of Mar 17, 2017: BGI, Agilent Technologies, ReadCoor, and GeneNews

The Thermo Fisher subsidiary is not liable to Promega in the US for selling infringing forensic DNA kits in Europe, containing US-manufactured Taq polymerase.

The firm's growth in China and pharmaceutical end markets help it beat the Wall Street estimate for revenue and EPS, despite currency headwinds.

Researchers at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory are among those pushing ion mobility spectrometry as a tool to boost complex biological sample analysis.

The European Commission has now approved the anti-PD-1 therapy Keytruda, and the Dako test with it, as a first-line treatment for non-small cell lung cancer.

Agilent filed a lawsuit against Twist nearly a year ago, alleging that Twist Cofounder and CEO Emily LeProust had stolen DNA oligonucleotide synthesis technology. 

The bank rated companies like Thermo Fisher Scientific and Agilent at Buy, Illumina and PerkinElmer at Hold, and Myriad Genetics and Luminex at Sell.

The collaborators will explore the use of cell-free DNA for preimplantation genetic testing. 

The investment bank provided the updates as part of its 2017 outlook on the US life science tools and diagnostics markets.

Agilent will offer Rubicon's amplification kits alongside one of its pre-screen kits, both of which are used in reproductive health testing. 

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As the Canadian election season heats up, neither major party has really paid much attention to science, according to Nature News.

BBC News says the uncertainty over Brexit is affecting science funding in the UK.

A new app purports to tell users "how gay" they are by looking at their DNA, but experts tell Futurism that the app is bunk.

In Nature this week: human and great ape cerebral organoids reveal aspects of brain development unique to humans, and more.