Agendia

Under the deal, Singapore-based Angsana Molecular & Diagnostics Laboratory will offer the two tests in markets including Singapore.

Unicancer will provide patients with centralized laboratory testing performed by Agendia, and also adopt the company's NGS kits for decentralized testing.

The coverage decisions follow similar decisions by Blue Shield of California and First Coast Service Options last year.

The change will be felt most immediately in Europe, where the Dutch molecular diagnostics company recently secured a CE-IVD mark for its MammaPrint BluePrint kit.

The company hopes that meeting the needs of a more decentralized testing model will increase access to its products for European women with breast cancer.

Although a draft guidance last month recommended against use of molecular tests to guide chemotherapy, the group's finalized decision is subject to price negotiation and other adjustments.

The NGS kit combines Agendia's MammaPrint 70-gene breast cancer recurrence risk test and its BluePrint breast cancer subtyping assay.

The hospital will run Agendia's new NGS test kit in its lab, comparing results with the firm's existing centralized MammaPrint test.

The institute will run the company's new NGS test kit in its lab, comparing results with Agendia's existing centralized microarray version of the two assays.

Companies are now expected to have their tests cleared by authorities for clinical use, and to bring their entire catalogs into line with the new regulations by May 2022.

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Lawmakers have asked four direct-to-consumer genetic testing companies to explain their privacy policies and security measures, according to Stat News.

The Trump Administration has proposed a plan to reorganize the federal government, the Washington Post reports.

In Science this week: genetic overlap among many psychiatric disorders, and more.

The Economist writes that an increasing number of scientific journals don't do peer review.