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Abbott

Abbott will develop a PCR-based test for an antigen in non-small cell lung cancer tumors for a GSK drug candidate.

The '989 "Caskey" patent, assigned to Baylor College of Medicine, covers molecular multiplexing and the '767 "Stanbridge" patent, assigned to the University of California, covers molecular detection of prokaryotic organisms, mostly bacteria.

The suit, filed by the UI Research Foundation, claims that Abbott has infringed one or more claims of the patents by manufacturing its billion-dollar blockbuster monoclonal antibody Humira, which is used to treat a variety of autoimmune diseases.

The UCSF Viral Diagnostics and Discovery Center, located near the school's Mission Bay, Calif., campus, will use the ViroChip pathogen-identification and screening tool as its "core technology."

The UCSF Viral Diagnostics and Discovery Center will use sequencing, microarrays, and other genomic technologies to characterize pathogens linked to acute and chronic human illnesses.

The suit revolves around patents owned by UNeMed, the technology-transfer organization for the UN Medical Center, and exclusively licensed to Abbot Laboratories, though Abbott is not listed as a co-plaintiff on the complaint.

The California District court denied motions for summary judgment of invalidity of Abbott's in situ DNA hybridization patent.

LGC will develop clinical and non-clinical applications for the Ibis T5000 Biosensor System.

Snippets: Apr 1, 2009

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Epigenomics, Response Genetics, Exact Sciences

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In PLOS this week: Mycobacterium abscessus linked to gastric conditions, placental gene expression changes associated with preterm birth, and more.

The Guardian reports that UK universities are looking into ways to reduce labs' reliance on single-use plastics.

People with certain gene variants tend to not like vegetables, particularly bitter ones, CNN reports.

MIT's Technology Review reports on a company's genetic test that gauges an embryo's susceptibility to certain diseases.