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Abbott

Sema4 said it will provide SARS-CoV-2 viral and antibody testing to Connecticut residents including state employees and first responders.

And Now Machines

According to NPR, there's a growing shortage of machines to run SARS-CoV-2 tests.

More than 70 percent of labs surveyed experienced supply chain interruptions, forcing them to validate three or more diagnostic testing methods.

The company's adaptive low-resource testing technology requires no instrumentation and limited equipment, making it adaptable to settings without clinical lab infrastructure.

The approval was based on data showing superior efficacy for Alunbrig compared to Pfizer's Xalkori, especially in patients with brain metastasis.

A recent study from New York University found Abbott's ID Now rapid point-of-care test could return false negative results.

The paper, which is not peer-reviewed, said that use of the test as a first-step screening tool would require confirmation of more than 80 percent of its results.

The PCR-based test received EUA for use on the Alinity m platform after receiving authorization in March on the firm's m2000 RealTime System. 

Missed Ones

An analysis by Cleveland Clinic researchers finds some SARS-CoV-2 tests have a high false negative rate, NPR reports.

Pages

Nature News reports on the US National Science Foundation's investigations of undisclosed foreign ties among researchers it funds.

Researchers have developed a set of 10 principles to guide how a list of all species on earth should be put together, the Guardian reports.

Wired reports on a new firm developing a gene writing approach for therapeutic genome changes.

In Nature this week: a method called cis-X combines whole-genome and transcriptome sequencing data to identify regulatory noncoding variants, and more.