23andMe | GenomeWeb


The firm said the panel will help include African Americans in health-focused genetic research, which has been skewed towards people with European ancestry. 

Living DNA can break down the origins of a customer’s ancestry into 21 distinct regions within Britain alone, as well as across 80 different worldwide populations.

A new PGen study reports that nearly 6 percent of consumers made changes to their prescription medication based on pharmacogenomic testing. 

A recent study examining the websites of 30 DTC genomics firms found that many do not follow international recommendations for disclosing information to customers.

As many as 10,000 Nevadans will get free genetic testing through a large population health study being conducted by non-profit care network Renown Health. 

Constance Watson at the Spectator writes that consumer personal genomics is "fascinating," but also a little worrying.

The study confirmed 17 previously identified loci, and uncovered 14 new ones that researchers hope can improve understanding of BCC pathogenesis and inform strategies for prevention.

23andMe's database has enabled it to link loci to disease and fuel better understanding of diseases like depression, KQED Science says.

Despite initial enthusiasm, the majority of enrollees haven't stayed engaged with the app and relatively few have submitted genetic data from 23andMe.

With genotypes for hundreds of thousands of individuals, investigators uncovered 15 loci linked to major depressive disorder in individuals with European ancestry.


Precision medicine has to consider context in addition to genetic mutations in cancer treatment, Medscape reports.

Genomics may help the Cavendish banana from succumbing to fungal infections, a trio of researchers writes at the Conversation.

In PNAS this week: miR-515 levels higher in women with preeclampsia, horizontal gene transfer in parasitic plants, and more.

A cancer researcher retracts 19 articles from one journal for image manipulation, according to Retraction Watch.