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23andMe

Layoffs at 23andMe

Direct-to-consumer genetic testing firm 23andMe is laying off about 100 people.

The layoffs occurred across 23andMe's consumer business, which is being restructured, but did not impact its therapeutics business.

Now, Developer

Bloomberg reports that 23andMe has licensed an antibody it developed to treat inflammatory diseases to a Spanish drugmaker.

As 2020 dawns, forensic genomics is poised for growth as companies aim to harness the power of consumer databases coupled with advances in sequencing.

According to Yahoo News, the Pentagon is warning members of the military that direct-to-consumer DNA testing kits might raise security risks.

Consumer Reports examines the complexities of giving a DNA testing kit as a holiday gift.

A Different Future

In his look back at the past decade, BuzzFeed News' Peter Aldhous writes that direct-to-consumer genetic testing has led to "Facebook for genes."

The genomics-focused fertility management company claims that 23andMe failed to meet its contractual obligations within a research collaboration.

23andMe has a holiday popup shop at a mall and could open additional stores, Bloomberg reports.

Researchers analyzed data from 23andMe and the UK Biobank to find that errors of recombination, like uniparental disomy, can be present among healthy individuals.

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Rady Children's Institute for Genomic Medicine and Deloitte are looking into the use of drones to transport samples for testing. 

Direct-to-consumer genetic testing firm 23andMe is laying off about 100 people.

Researchers from Northwestern University examined dust for antibiotic-resistance genes, New Scientist reports. 

In Science this week: researchers present a computational method for predicting cellular differentiation state from single-cell RNA sequencing data, and more.