23andMe

The Bay Area startup has designed a menu of apps related to sleep, caffeine metabolism, and other indications.

The Smarty Pants

A number of genomics companies have made Technology Review's list of smart companies.

What Can Be Learned

US News and World Report describes what consumers can glean from direct-to-consumer genetic tests.

Researchers found that direct-to-consumer genetic testing customers' primary motivation to share their genomic data was not to gain health specific knowledge.

Researchers saw a small, but significant uptick in self-reported healthy eating and exercise frequency after 23andMe or Pathway Genomics DTC testing.

The re-emergence of direct-to-consumer genetic health risk tests has healthcare providers worried once again about their impact and utility.

Few Years Later

23andMe can again sell its direct-to-consumer genetic health risk tests after obtaining FDA authorization.

Following the premarket authorization of 23andMe's tests, the agency may allow other firms to sell similar tests DTC without having to submit them for review.

The company has developed a suite of initial products focused on ancestry that will compete with offerings from 23andMe, AncestryDNA, and Family Tree DNA.

The companies will recruit and track a cohort of women to study environmental, genetic, and lifestyle factors that may contribute to fertility outcomes.

Pages

Technology Review reports that researchers in the US have used CRISPR to modify a number of human embryos.

Plant researchers plan to sequence some 10,000 samples that represent the major plant clades, ScienceInsider reports.

By introducing genes from butterfly peas and Canterbury bells, researchers in Japan have developed a blue chrysanthemum, according to NPR.

In Nature this week: a Danish reference genome, and more.