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10X Genomics

 

10x Genomics, Inc. is an American company incorporated in 2012 that develops and manufactures integrated systems for whole genome sequencing, exome sequencing and single cell transcriptomics. Its headquarters are located in Pleasanton, California.

 

10X Genomics Company Profile  

 

President & CEO: Serge Saxonov

CEO photo:

 10X Genomics CEO photo - Serge Saxonov

Website: http://10xgenomics.com

Headquarters: Pleasanton, CA

10x Genomics employees: 101-250

Funding: $113M USD

Founded: 2012

Founders: Serge Saxonov, Ben Hindson


 

10x Genomics News 

The researchers have generated the most contiguous de novo assembly of a human genome to date and plan to use it as a reference for population sequencing projects.

The deal comes on the heels of four other distribution agreements the firm has signed in the Asia-Pacific region for its Chromium molecular barcoding system and products.

The genomics company said the new agreements cover South Korea, Australia, New Zealand, Southeast Asia, and China.

The hybrid approach expands on one described last year by Mount Sinai researchers, and relies on short-read sequencing, linked-read sequencing, and genome mapping.

The firm will use the latest investment to support marketing and sales of its linked-read platforms and support development of future products.

The Broad Institute is running Chromium in its lab, while other early-access users are collaborating with 10X Genomics on single-cell RNA-seq and exome studies.

The companies will each create products using Agilent's SureSelect target enrichment technology on 10x's Chromium platform.

The companies plan to combine Qiagen's sample technologies with 10x's microfluidics-based linked-read sequencing systems.

In a study published in Nature Biotechnology today, the researchers used the GemCode platform to haplotype a HapMap family trio, a cancer cell line, and a primary cancer.

Executives from the sequencing tech firms provided attendees with an update on recently launched products and platforms, and future technology developments.

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The Wall Street Journal looks into FamilyTreeDNA's handling of genetic genealogy searches by law enforcement.

In a point-counterpoint in the Boston Globe, researchers discuss the potential of gene editing to prevent Lyme disease, but also the pitfalls of doing so.

MIT's Technology Review reports that researchers hope to develop a CRISPR-based pain therapy.

In Science this week: atlas of malaria parasites' gene expression across their life cycles, and more.