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10X Genomics

 

10x Genomics, Inc. is an American company incorporated in 2012 that develops and manufactures integrated systems for whole genome sequencing, exome sequencing and single cell transcriptomics. Its headquarters are located in Pleasanton, California.

 

10X Genomics Company Profile  

 

President & CEO: Serge Saxonov

CEO photo:

 10X Genomics CEO photo - Serge Saxonov

Website: http://10xgenomics.com

Headquarters: Pleasanton, CA

10x Genomics employees: 101-250

Funding: $113M USD

Founded: 2012

Founders: Serge Saxonov, Ben Hindson


 

10x Genomics News 

In Genome Research this week: repetitive satellite DNA in the fruit fly, transcriptome map assembly pipeline, and more.

The firm is in the process of commercializing an open, optimizable, high-throughput library preparation instrument for single-cell transcriptome profiling.

Specialized single-cell "cores" are popping up to help scientists get the most out of new technologies.

The single-cell VDJ profiling kit is the first of a suite of immunology products the company plans to launch this year.

Following an inter partes review requested by 10x Genomics, the Patent Trial and Appeal Board invalidated a number of claims in a RainDance patent.

The two new single-cell RNA-sequencing methods aim to overcome some of the limitations of single-cell transcriptomics.

Executives provided updates on their companies at the 35th Annual JP Morgan Healthcare Conference in San Francisco, CA, Day Two

The companies will merge 10x's Chromium system and PerkinElmer's automation solutions into a combined NGS solution for researchers.

The approach, which uses 10x Genomics technology for haplotyping, requires neither mutation-specific assays nor DNA from affected family members.

By analyzing the transcriptomes of more than 4,000 individual cells, researchers identified stem cell-like cellular subpopulations in six oligodendroglioma tumors.

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A letter criticizing actions by the US government and research institutions toward Chinese and Chinese-American scientists has garnered more than a hundred signatories.

NPR reports that researchers in New York are investigating whether it is possible to edit the genomes of human sperm.

In an opinion piece at the Nation, Sarah Lawrence College's Laura Hercher argues that everyone should be able to access prenatal genetic testing.

In Nature this week: ancient DNA uncovers presence of Mediterranean migrants at a Himalayan lake, and more.