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People in the News: Ron Andrews, Uwe Bicker, Jason Terrell, and More

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Quantitative digital pathology firm Definiens has appointed a new advisory board to provide independent advice on trends in tissue diagnostics and clinical digital pathology.

Members of the advisory board include Ron Andrews, president of medical sciences at Life Technologies and former CEO of Clarient and CEO of GE Molecular Diagnostics; Uwe Bicker, dean of the Medical Faculty Mannheim at the University of Heidelberg and a member of the board of directors of Sanofi; Manfred Dietel, director of the Institute of Pathology at Charité Berlin and chairman of the German Society for Pathology; Eric Glassy, medical director of Pathology Inc. and chairman of the Digital Pathology Working Group of the College of American Pathologists; and Gerd Binnig, founder and chief technology officer of Definiens.


VolitionRx, a Singapore-based developer of blood-based cancer diagnostics, has hired Jason Terrell as head of US operations.

Terrell, who will act as the company’s liaison with the US Food and Drug Administration, owns and operates a number of diagnostic laboratories in Texas within the Any Lab Test Now franchise. He has also served as a national franchise corporate medical director for Any Lab Test Now.

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