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People In The News: Oct 14, 2011

NEW YORK (GenomeWeb News) – John Opitz, a medical geneticist at the University of Utah, has been awarded the William Allan Award by the American Society of Human Genetics for his work in identifying and understanding genetic syndromes. Opitz has defined a number of genetic syndromes including Smith-Lemli-Opitz syndrome, a developmental disorder caused by a defect in the way cholesterol is synthesized, and Opitz G/BBB syndrome, a condition that causes physical malformations.


The University of Pittsburgh has awarded J. Craig Venter the Dickson Prize for his efforts in genome sequencing, including leading efforts to sequence the first human genome and creating a living bacteria cell with synthetic DNA. Venter is the founder of Synthetic Genomics, the J. Craig Venter Institute, the Institute for Genomic Research, and Celera Genomics. He holds a PhD in pharmacology and physiology and a BS in biochemistry from the University of California, San Diego.


PrimeraDx has appointed Jeff Liter as vice president of corporate development. Prior to joining the firm, he was director of strategy, business development, and licensing for Beckman Coulter, where he worked in the company's immunoassay and molecular diagnostics groups. Liter was previously the managing director with On Point Consulting.


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The Scan

Interfering With Invasive Mussels

The Chicago Tribune reports that researchers are studying whether RNA interference- or CRISPR-based approaches can combat invasive freshwater mussels.

Participation Analysis

A new study finds that women tend to participate less at scientific meetings but that some changes can lead to increased involvement, the Guardian reports.

Right Whales' Decline

A research study plans to use genetic analysis to gain insight into population decline among North American right whales, according to CBC.

Science Papers Tie Rare Mutations to Short Stature, Immunodeficiency; Present Single-Cell Transcriptomics Map

In Science this week: pair of mutations in one gene uncovered in brothers with short stature and immunodeficiency, and more.