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People In The News: Jan 28, 2011

By a GenomeWeb staff reporter

NEW YORK (GenomeWeb News) – Brian McNamee, a member of the board of directors at Gen-Probe, does not plan to stand for re-election to the position. Gen-Probe said in a filing with the US Securities and Exchange Commission that McNamee, who has served on its board on and off since 2002, decided to depart the board due to the demands of his position as CEO of CSL.


Oxford Medical Diagnostics has appointed Graham Richards to serve on its science advisory board. Graham is a professor at Oxford University, where he spent a decade as chairman of the Department of Chemistry, and currently is head of the Centre for Computational Drug Discovery. He also was a founder of the Oxford University spinoff Oxford Molecular Group and a director of Isis Innovation.


Former US Food and Drug Administration Commissioner and Director of the National Cancer Institute Andrew von Eschenbach has joined the board of directors at Viamet Pharmaceuticals. The RTP, NC-based drug company develops metalloenzymes for use in potential therapeutics.


Promoted? Changing jobs? GenomeWeb wants to know. E-mail [email protected] to appear in People In The News, a weekly roundup of industry comings and goings.

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