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Silicon Valley Biosystems, Mayo Clinic Partner on Clinical Sequencing

NEW YORK (GenomeWeb News) – Silicon Valley Biosystems and the Mayo Clinic announced late on Monday a deal aimed at improving "accessibility and clinical utility of next-generation sequencing for patients."

The deal brings together SV Bio's genome interpretation tools and Mayo's genome reference library. Under its terms, SV Bio will provide clinical genome interpretation services and clinical decision support interfaces to Mayo. Mayo's Center for Individualized Medicine will provide clinical and laboratory expertise and support.

SV Bio is based in Foster City, Calif., and launched last week. Its turnkey genomics interpretation solutions query a patient's genome and distill the data into an actionable report to support physician treatment decisions. Together, it and Mayo will refine methods for clinical genomic interpretation, they said.

"In our laboratories, we are rapidly adopting and implementing next-generation sequencing as a platform upon which we will be providing cutting-edge genome-based testing," Franklin Cockerill , president of Mayo Medical Laboratories, said in a statement. "This collaboration with SV Bio furthers our mission of bringing the latest diagnostic technologies to health care providers around the world."

Financial and other terms of the deal were not disclosed.

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