Skip to main content
Premium Trial:

Request an Annual Quote

Paired Ends: Ivan Trifunovich, Andrew Senyei, Paul Bianchi, and More

Premium

Ivan Trifunovich has resigned from his position as CEO of Helicos, effective Sept. 14 and has resigned from his position as executive chairman and board member, effective Aug. 31. Trifunovich took on the role of CEO two years ago amidst a restructuring to focus the company's efforts on leveraging its intellectual property portfolio (IS 10/19/2010). In March, he decreased his role to part-time.

Trifunovich is also the president, CEO, and director of WaferGen. Previously, he served as senior vice president of Third Wave Technologies, now part of Hologic. Before that he held several sales and marketing and R&D positions with large pharmaceutical companies.


Andrew Senyei has resigned from Complete Genomics' board of directors. He is also a managing director and general partner of Enterprise Partners, where he leads the venture capital firm's life sciences practice. Previously, he co-founded biotech company Molecular Biosytems, which was acquired by Alliance Pharmaceutical.


Illumina has appointed Paul Bianchi to senior vice president of human resources. He joins Illumina from Risk Management Solutions, where he was senior vice president of human resources. Previously, he was a principal at Strayer Consulting and he has also held human resources positions at PeopleSoft, Hands-On Mobile, Ask Jeeves, ProBusiness Services, NeXT Computer, and Apple. He holds an MS in management from the University of Kent, Canterbury, and a BS in management economics from the University of California, Davis.


The National Human Genome Research Institute is reorganizing, and as such, has appointed a number of people to head its newly created divisions. Jeffrey Schloss will serve as director of the Division of Genome Sciences with Peter Good as deputy director. Teri Manolio and Brad Ozenberger will serve as director and deputy director, respectively of the Division of Genomic Medicine. Bettie Graham and Rudy Pozzatti will serve as director and deputy director, respectively, of the Division of Extramural Operations. Mark Guyer will lead the Division of Genomics and Society on an interim basis until the search for a permanent director is completed. All four of these divisions now comprise NHGRI's Extramural Research Program.

Additionally, the Office of Policy, Communications and Education will become the Division of Policy, Communications and Education and will be led by Laura Lyman Rodgriguez. The Office of Administrative Management will become the Division of Management, led by executive officer M. Janis Mullaney and deputy executive officer Ellen Rolfes.

Jane Peterson will become senior advisor to the NHGRI Office of the Director, Vence Bonham will be senior advisor to the NHGRI director on genomics and health disparities, and Karen Rothenberg will be a senior advisor to the NHGRI director on genomics and society.


Real Time Genomics has appointed Francisco De La Vega to vice president of genome science. De La Vega has been a visiting professor at the department of genetics at Stanford School of Medicine. Previously, he spent 13 years at Life Technologies (previously Applied Biosystems), most recently as distinguished scientific fellow and vice president of next-generation sequencing applications. He was also a member of the 1000 Genomes Project Consortium. He holds a PhD in genetics and molecular biology from the Center for Research and Advanced Studies at the National Polytechnic Institute of Mexico.

The Scan

Booster for At-Risk

The New York Times reports that the US Food and Drug Administration has authorized a third dose of the Pfizer-BioNTech SARS-CoV-2 vaccine for people over 65 or at increased risk.

Preprints OK to Mention Again

Nature News reports the Australian Research Council has changed its new policy and now allows preprints to be cited in grant applications.

Hundreds of Millions More to Share

The US plans to purchase and donate 500 million additional SARS-CoV-2 vaccine doses, according to the Washington Post.

Nature Papers Examine Molecular Program Differences Influencing Neural Cells, Population History of Polynesia

In Nature this week: changes in molecular program during embryonic development leads to different neural cell types, and more.