Skip to main content
Premium Trial:

Request an Annual Quote

Paired Ends: Aug 31, 2010

Premium

Daniel Kastner has been selected as the scientific director of the National Human Genome Research Institute and will take up his post in early October. He is currently the clinical director and the director of translational research at the National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases. At NHGRI, Kastner will lead the division of intramural research. He joined NIAMS as a research fellow in 1987 and became a senior staff fellow in 1990. He then became acting chief and later chief of the genetics section of the arthritis and rheumatism branch, which was later converted into the genetics and genomics branch. He holds a PhD and medical degree from Baylor College of Medicine and an AB in philosophy from Princeton University.


Harry Hixson, CEO of Sequenom, has resigned from the board of directors of NovaBay Pharmaceuticals due to his increasing executive responsibilities at Sequenom. He had served as a NovaBay director since early 2009.

The Scan

Ancient Greek Army Ancestry Highlights Mercenary Role in Historical Migrations

By profiling genomic patterns in 5th century samples from in and around Himera, researchers saw diverse ancestry in Greek army representatives in the region, as they report in PNAS.

Estonian Biobank Team Digs into Results Return Strategies, Experiences

Researchers in the European Journal of Human Genetics outline a procedure developed for individual return of results for the population biobank, along with participant experiences conveyed in survey data.

Rare Recessive Disease Insights Found in Individual Genomes

Researchers predict in Genome Medicine cross-population deletions and autosomal recessive disease impacts by analyzing recurrent nonallelic homologous recombination-related deletions.

Genetic Tests Lead to Potential Prognostic Variants in Dutch Children With Dilated Cardiomyopathy

Researchers in Circulation: Genomic and Precision Medicine found that the presence of pathogenic or likely pathogenic variants was linked to increased risk of death and poorer outcomes in children with pediatric dilated cardiomyopathy.