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LabCorp Launches Clinical Sequencing Business, Enlighten Health Genomics

NEW YORK (GenomeWeb) – Laboratory Corporation of America today launched Enlighten Health Genomics to leverage the capabilities of next-generation sequencing technology in the clinical setting.

Part of LabCorp's Enlighten Health business — which provides services and tools to improve treatment decisions, lower costs, and improve patient outcomes — Enlighten Health Genomics will combine LabCorp's infrastructure and capabilities with the expertise of geneticists to offer diagnostic services, NGS analysis and interpretation, and genetic counseling.

Later this year, Enlighten Health Genomics will launch a whole-exome sequencing testing service called ExomeReveal, which will perform genome-wide interpretation of children with serious childhood genetic diseases, as well as diagnostic interpretation for patients regardless of age.

"Enlighten Health Genomics is an important part of LabCorp's strategy to capitalize on our unique assets, create new sources of revenue from our core capabilities, and meaningfully differentiate us from competitors," LabCorp Chairman and CEO David King said in a statement.

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