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Trovagene, NWU Institutions Partner to Assess Oncogene Mutation Monitoring Tech

NEW YORK (GenomeWeb) — Trovagene has entered into a strategic partnership with two Northwestern University institutions to assess the utility of Trovagene's urine-based cell-free oncogene mutation monitoring technology in clinical practice.

Under the alliance, the Robert H. Lurie Comprehensive Care Center and the Northwestern Medicine Developmental Therapeutics Institute will work with Trovagene on clinical protocols that incorporate oncogene mutation monitoring during the course of cancer treatment, and assess their impact on overall disease management and patient outcomes.

"The Lurie Cancer Center is focused on advancing personalized medicine through collaborations with leading developers of state-of-the-art genomic technologies, such as Trovagene, to facilitate clinical decision making and improve patient care," Leonidas Platanias, interim director of the Lurie Cancer Center, said in a statement.

"We look forward to working with the Lurie Cancer Center and NMDTI as Trovagene continues to expand the number of top healthcare institutions evaluating our precision cancer monitoring technology for implementation into the clinic," Trovagene CEO Antonius Schuh added in a statement.

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