Originally published Oct. 29.

In a preliminary study, researchers have discovered that rearrangements in a gene called NTRK1 may drive lung cancer in a minority of patients. If confirmed in a larger trial, this marker will join the ever growing list of genetic aberrations that doctors can use to reclassify the lung cancer population into smaller and smaller patient subsets based on the unique molecular characteristics of their illness.

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