NEW YORK (GenomeWeb) – The Geisinger Health System has struck a partnership with German personalized cancer services company Indivumed to collect and study patient samples and develop targeted treatments, the partners said today.

The agreement will enable Indivumed and Geisinger to collect samples from consenting patients who are already undergoing a surgical tumor resection. The partners will store portions of those tissue, blood, or urine samples at Geisinger via the MyCode repository, and in an Indivumed bank, where they will be analyzed.

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