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The funding, part of a larger initiative by Genome Canada, will support two studies in British Columbia that will evaluate genomics in healthcare.

The initiative is aiming to solve some of the existing problems in genomics research and build a resource that takes a step beyond gnomAD.

The British Columbia Centre for Disease Control will use genomic analysis to identify the origins and spread of SARS-CoV-2, formerly known as 2019-nCoV.

The funding comes from the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation, which previously provided the company with $500,000 for the test's initial development.

The program will aim to develop and evaluate genomics and informatics tools to improve the diagnosis, treatment, and prevention of disease.

The president's latest budget request marks the fourth time he has sought to reduce funding to the National Institutes of Health.

The agency is also hosting a portal for submissions and inquiries as part of the newly created Medical Countermeasures Taskforce.

The National Human Genome Research Institute and the National Cancer Institute also intend to fund the dissemination of genomic resources to the research community.

Gladstone Institutes researchers will use proteomic, genomic, and gene-altering approaches to investigate apoe4 toxicity as part of a five-year project.

Researchers from UBC, the BC Centre for Disease Control, and elsewhere will conduct a multi-omics study of the foodborne pathogen.

The panels will select candidate genes that will have a high impact on clinical practice in areas of high priority for participating institutes and centers.

An international group of researchers aim to develop an approach that may be able to diagnose multiple conditions, including pneumonia, tuberculosis, sepsis, with one blood sample.

Illumina, Twist Bioscience, and DNA Script are among the private sector collaborators of the groups receiving funds to develop technology platforms.

The funding supports development of a low-cost platform for detection of antimicrobial resistance elements in complex microbial communities. 

The budget for fiscal year 2020 includes increases for each of the NIH's institutes and centers, as well as the FDA and the NSF.

The researchers are aiming to provide new insights as to which cancer patients will respond best to immunotherapy based on their genetic backgrounds.

The House bill also includes funding increases for the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the US Food and Drug Administration.

The seven-year grant renews funding for the Antibacterial Resistance Leadership Group, led by Duke University and UCSF, with $15 million in 2020.

The center is responsible for developing and maintaining the technical platforms by which people participate in and engage with the program.

The funding comes about three years after Amgen provided the school with $1.5 million for a master's degree program in human genetics and genetic counseling.

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A study of families explores how children transmit SARS-CoV-2, according to the Associated Press.

US Agricultural Research Service scientists have sequenced the genome of the Asian giant hornet.

According to the Economist, pooled testing for COVID-19 could help alleviate strains on testing labs.

In Science this week: MIT researchers outline approach dubbed translatable components regression to predict treatment response among IBD patients.