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The firm also continues to use its methylation-specific PCR technology to develop assays for partners in the oncology space.

Cancer Research UK has awarded nearly £60 million in funding to three US investigator-led research initiatives focused on cancer progression and drug response.

The new, multinational iReceptor Plus Consortium will develop a platform for sharing of AIRR-seq data to advance immunotherapy and precision medicine.

Unveiled in September, the HuBMAP program is an open, global framework supporting efforts to build a map of cells within the adult human body.

The company will donate the Infinium Global Diversity array it developed for the program to the three All of Us genome centers to process up to 1 million samples.

The funding is being provided to a number of early-career investigators and collaborative research groups using genomics and other technologies.

For the two five year grants, the NIH will favor applicants with experience providing counseling throughout the US and to diverse and disadvantaged communities.  

Signature Science will assess the validity of metagenomic and metatranscriptomic analyses to detect the transmission of viable pathogens in healthcare settings.

The team said it will partner with startup Early Diagnostics to commercialize the assay, which integrates DNA methylation analysis and computational technology.

The projects are organized by the Eliminate Cancer Initiative, the National Brain Tumor Society, and the Pediatric Brain Tumor Foundation.

Count Me In is aiming to sign up more than 100,000 patients across all major cancer types, as well as rare cancers, over the next several years.

The five startup companies are focused on molecular diagnostics, precision oncology, personalized medicine, and more.

With the three-year grants, the institutions will continue an initiative that is developing tools and technologies for genome biology research.

DiaCarta scientists will partner with the University of Florida Health Cancer Center to analyze blood samples from up to 500 cancer patients undergoing radiotherapy.

A $5 million NIH grant will fund CPIC's ongoing work to develop PGx guidelines and an API for incorporating them into EHRs and clinical decision support systems.

The technology uses a conducting polymer-based electrochemical chip with an array of electrodes and employs an electrical field to release and detect mutations.

Participants aim to use predictive modeling to better understand epigenetic mechanisms, while encouraging the development of new technologies and therapies.

The funding, spread over 89 awards, includes grants for molecular and genomics research efforts across multiple institutions, by early-career and otherwise innovative scientists.

The NHS will expand on existing efforts such as the 100,000 Genomes Project and will offer people with rare diseases the opportunity to sequence their genomes.

The firm will use the funding to develop and validate an expanded version of its somatic cancer hotspot and monitoring assays.

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Mainichi reports that 43 percent of Japanese individuals said they did not want to eat agricultural products that had been modified using gene-editing tools.

Two US Department of Agriculture research departments are moving to the Kansas City area, according to the Washington Post.

Slate's Jane Hu compares some at-home genetic tests to astrology.

In PLOS this week: analysis of polygenic risk scores for skin cancer, chronic pain GWAS, and more.