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The tests will run on Bosch's automated Vivalytic platform, with BioGX developing, manufacturing, and supplying reagents for the cartridges.

The test kit is designed to detect regions of the virus' nucleocapsid and envelope genes in upper respiratory specimens and bronchoalveolar lavage.

Bio-Techne said pathologists now have access to its fully automated RNAscope technology, providing them with a new tool to evaluate disease biomarkers.

The company's adaptive low-resource testing technology requires no instrumentation and limited equipment, making it adaptable to settings without clinical lab infrastructure.

The three RT-PCR-based tests are only authorized for use at their respective developers' CLIA-certified laboratories, according to the FDA.

All three kits run on authorized PCR instruments and may be performed by any laboratory CLIA-certified to perform high-complexity tests.

The test is authorized for a variety of samples, including oral fluid collected with OraSure Technologies' Omnigene Oral OM-505 saliva collection device.

During evaluations of 180 randomized specimens, the Genedrive 96 SARS-CoV-2 Kit achieved 100 percent sensitivity and 98.2 percent specificity, the firm said.

More than a dozen studies have been published to date directly comparing molecular diagnostic COVID-19 tests, with some detecting differences, mostly in sensitivity.

Single-cell analysis, next-generation sequencing, and synthetic DNA have all been crucial to efforts to find antibodies that could neutralize SARS-CoV-2.

With a €930,000 from Horizon 2020, the firm is conducting additional stories to evaluate other uses for the test, including using new specimen types and patient cohorts.

British bioinformatics firm PrecisionLife has mined the UK Biobank to identify genetic risk factors for late-stage COVID-19 patients developing sepsis.

The RT-PCR test targets the N gene and E gene regions of the SARS-CoV-2 genome in a multiplex format.

A professor of pathology and laboratory medicine, Gregory Tsongalis has published a paper detailing his lab's work on SARS-CoV-2 testing and the challenges faced.

Low levels of lymphocytes appeared to predict disease severity among a cohort of more than 300 COVID-19 patients, while viral genetic differences did not.

In a study published last month, Mammoth demonstrated the technology's sensitivity, specificity, and speed compared to PCR-based COVID-19 testing.

The test does not require thermal cycling and uses a colorimetric readout, making it more amenable to high-throughput automation and rapid scale-up, the company said.

The companies are making three COVID-19 tools available immediately for early access, with plans to add other nCounter software and potentially develop new products.

The firm said it will use the funds for general corporate purposes, which may include investment and acquisitions, working capital, and debt repayment.

The companies collaborated in Wuhan during the COVID-19 outbreak, using Darui's pathogenic microorganism detection kits on Genetron's next-generation sequencer.

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The Washington Post reports on researchers' efforts to determine the effect of an increasingly common SARS-CoV-2 mutation.

Florida Politics reports Florida's law barring life, long-term care, and disability insurers from using genetic information in coverage decisions went into effect at the beginning of July.

A new analysis finds a link between popular media coverage of a scientific study and how often that paper is cited.

In Nature this week: CRISPR approaches to editing plant genomes, way to speed up DNA-PAINT, and more.