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More articles about Gene Silencing/Gene Editing

The system uses the Cas13 nuclease to identify target sites in various RNA viruses and then destroy them.

Last week's SynBioBeta conference was indicative of the high degree of interest in the synthetic bio space from omics research tool vendors.

The company said its test is faster, more precise, and cheaper than the current gold standard Cepheid GeneXpert test.

The researchers repurposed type I variants of class 1 CRISPR systems to make them usable for DNA targeting and transcriptional control.

The Boston-based synthetic biology firm said it will use the funds to grow its cell programing platform, which it will make available to startups.

The blood-based test is designed to detect changes in levels of microRNAs that are enriched in specific brain regions affected by Alzheimer's disease.

The firm saw steady growth in its research reagents and screening businesses, and a 155 percent revenue increase in its bioproduction unit.

The Genome Sensor — the first product Cardea will market under the Nanosens brand — will allow the user to Google a genome using a single guide RNA.

The companies also launched an early-access program for their first CRISPR-Chip-based product, the Genome Sensor.

The team found that base editors that exhibit RNA off-target editing can also self-edit their own transcripts, leading to heterogeneity in their coding sequences.

Even as the chip is being used to detect diseases, its inventors are also finding that the it can be used to validate other CRISPR-based technologies.

The researchers will evaluate recent developments in human genome editing as well as responses from the public and scientific communities.

The team tested the system in living mice with progeria, inserting a normal copy of the LMNA gene into the animals to diminish features of the disease.

Built on concepts developed in Timothy Lu's MIT lab, a new approach to DNA-based computing in a cell increases precision and, potentially, scale.

The researchers identified genes that specifically extend the lifespan of neurons and found genes that increase the number of neurites in the brain.

The NAM, NAS, and Royal Society have formed a commission to develop a framework on the proper use of genome editing, and convened its first meeting in Washington, DC, this week.

The team used this system to perform orthogonal and multiplexed genome engineering of endogenous targets using up to 25 individual CRISPR RNAs.

Investigators saw signs that risky TP53 missense mutations may interfere with wild type copies of the tumor suppressor gene in acute myeloid leukemia and other myeloid cancers.

The Broad Institute called UC's new legal strategy "deeply unfortunate" and called on the university to "move beyond litigation."

As MPEG LA tries to complete its larger CRISPR IP patent pool, smaller license agreements continue and a mini-pool has emerged between key players.

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The Economist reports that it is increasingly easier to analyze the metabolites people give off, potentially revealing personal information about them.

A controversial paper on the gender gap in science has been corrected, according to BuzzFeed News.

The Los Angeles Times reports that only a third of California students meet the state's new science standards.

In Science this week: evidence of interbreeding between the ancestors of West Africans and an unknown archaic human, and more.