More articles about PCR | GenomeWeb

More articles about PCR

The RNA-based blood test takes less than five hours to detect the presence or absence of infection in patients who may have sepsis.

The firm said that its shares will begin trading on the OTCQB exchange starting on Feb. 22.

The assay has been available outside the US since November and runs on the Liaison MDX benchtop instrument. 

The test kit runs on standard qPCR platforms in under three hours, and detects 20 cancer-associated biomarkers from four oncogenes. 

Recently validated on pseudomonas and TB samples, the business card-sized device also enables on-chip extraction. 

The test analyzes the mitochondrial genome to determine which men with clinical suspicion of prostate cancer are likely to have high-grade disease.

The study compared five methods, including three based on Roche test kits and reagents, and suggested that a multiplexed test may be best to avoid false-negative results.

The tests are twice as fast as the firm's Xpert line and run on Cepheid's flagship GeneXpert system.

The preliminary revenue results come ahead of the company's planned merger with Takara Bio USA Holdings.

The new filing comes after the firm recently withdrew plans last month to raise $8 million. 

The three-hour PCR-based test looks for several serovars recommended for detection by the WHO, the firm said. 

As part of a restructuring and cost reduction plan the firm also reduced the principle of its 2016 convertible note by about half.

The firm's full-year 2016 revenues fell 9 percent, also on lower instrument sales.

The firm's molecular revenues rose 72 percent during the fourth quarter and 75 percent during full-year 2016.

The firm recently won an NIH grant to develop its instrument-free gonorrhea test, and is also developing a chlamydia assay with the long-term goal of making a combined CT/NG test.

The firm's ROS1 gene fusion kit was approved as a companion diagnostic for Pfizer's Xalkori.

Under a five-year NIH grant, the researchers will evaluate whether earlier diagnosis of fragile X and SMA leads to earlier intervention and improved outcomes.

The FDA granted Abbott Emergency Use Authorization for the assay in serum, plasma, and urine in November. 

The PCR-based test detects Bordetella pertussis, the infectious agent that causes whooping cough, directly from patient samples. 

The firms also plan to launch a multiplex test for multiple pathogens, including dengue. 

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An opinion piece in the New York Times urges lawmakers to keep genetic protections in place.

Research funding in Canada is to remain mostly the same, ScienceInsider reports.

In Science this week: random DNA replication errors play role in cancer, and more.

The Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation embarks on an open-access publishing path.