More articles about Policy & Legislation

In a filing with the federal appeals court, the DoJ attempted to strike a balance between rewarding inventions that result from genomic discoveries and ensuring that discoveries of natural phenomena remain in the "storehouse of knowledge of all men." Meanwhile, it's business as usual at the USPTO until the appeals court rules on Myriad's challenged BRCA patents.

Plaintiffs challenging one of Myriad's BRCA patents in the Australian federal court have applied to extend the scope of the case to include additional BRCA patents held by the company.

The DOJ's brief reverses the US government's previous practices regarding gene patents and sides with the District Court's decision that isolated DNA, in and of itself, is not patentable.

According to a notice from SACGHS this week, the committee's charter, slated to expire Sept. 23, will not be renewed by HHS Secretary Kathleen Sebelius.

Although the company is embroiled in a high-profile patent lawsuit involving its flagship BRACAnalysis test, and the FDA's plan to regulate laboratory-developed tests may impact all of its marketed products, Myriad officials maintain a positive outlook.

The Obama plan would expand, simplify, and make permanent the R&D tax credit policy that currently requires renewal.

The European Society of Human Genetics includes among its policy goals oversight for predictive medical genetic tests for utility and validity, marketing, privacy, consent, and counseling.

Many in the genetic testing industry have viewed the Bilski decision as a harbinger of the Supreme Court's thinking for future patent cases, including the anti-gene patenting suit filed against Myriad Genetics.

Myriad Genetics and the University of Utah Research Foundation are appealing a decision rendered in March that found that the company's BRCA gene patents are "unpatentable."

Cancer Voices Australia, the law firm Maurice Blackburn, and breast cancer patient Yvonne D'Arcy this week took legal action in Australia's Federal Court against four biotech companies — Myriad Genetics, Genetic Technologies, Centre de Recherce de Chul in Canada, and the Cancer Institute in Japan — to challenge the legality of gene patents.

According to unofficial results, the Third Frontier extension passed by a 62-38 percent margin, benefiting from a consensus of support among life sciences leaders, business leaders, and government officials from both political parties.

The money is part of the $22 million committed by the state in return for the nonprofit research and technology development institute locating its recently-opened Center for Advanced Drug Research, or CADRE, in Harrisonburg, Va.

The DOE components of the 2010 version of the act would create sequencing facilities and aim to advance synthetic biology.

A US District Court's ruling that Myriad's BRCA patents are invalid will definitely be appealed in the Federal Circuit, and will probably reach the Supreme Court, according to legal experts.

Restrictions in GINA could muddy payors' disease risk prediction models, though it remains to be seen the degree to which the law will "deteriorate" those predictions, Derek van Amerongen, chief medical officer of Humana Health Plans of Ohio, said last week at a conference.

Myriad's stock took a hit on Tuesday after a federal District Court declared the firm's BRCA gene patents were invalid.

The healthcare reform bill includes a section on comparative effectiveness research that creates the Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute. Seen as a victory for personalized medicine, the institute will study the utility of medical products in "various subpopulations," including groups differentiated by genetic and molecular subtypes.

The healthcare reform bill, expected to be signed into law by President Obama on March 23, includes a section on comparative effectiveness research that creates the Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute.

Leroy Hood called the bill short-sighted and said that over the long-term it could potentially reduce the attractiveness of starting up companies in the Seattle area.

The SACGHS report advises changes in the law to release diagnostic nucleic acid-based tests and genetics research from infringement liability.

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British Nobel laureates and Fields Medal winners warn that a 'hard' Brexit could harm science across the UK, the Guardian reports.

Vox reports on inequities in genetic research and efforts to address them.

The New York Times reports that Arizona State University's Lawrence Krauss is retiring following allegations of sexual misconduct.

In PNAS this week: de novo NUS1 mutations linked to Parkinson's disease risk, candidate hepatocellular carcinoma drivers, and more.