More articles about Policy & Legislation

The authors framed their report as a guidebook to help regulatory agencies across the globe coordinate "consistent" rules while allowing for societal differences.

Researchers fear the executive order will have long-lasting effects on the US' ability to recruit top talent, and will make the country less attractive as an international conference venue.

The organization cited ethical concerns and technological limitations surrounding CRISPR and other gene-editing approaches.

The agency expects existing programs to guide its regulation, adding that modified portions of animal genomes would be considered drugs.

The Genomics Evidence Neoplasia Information Exchange aims to provide insights through the analysis of data from tens if not hundreds of thousands of patient results.

The law contains provisions that proponents say will advance precision medicine and speed new tests to market, but critics worry if this will come at a cost to public health.

Key provisions of the legislation include additional funding for key National Institutes of Health programs, as well as a streamlining of the US Food and Drug Administration's approval process.

New York Governor Andrew Cuomo and New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio unveiled two initiatives that will provide funding and tax incentives for life sciences research and industry.

After passing the House of Representatives last week, the legislation is now set to go before President Barack Obama, who said he will sign it into law.

The case is being framed as either upholding a strong patent regime or dealing a blow to US-based manufacturing as part of the global supply chain.

With strong bipartisan support, the White House indicated that President Barack Obama will sign the legislation once it receives Senate approval.

Eric Dishman, Director, All of Us Research Program

NIH has been conservative on the PMI's budget and its funds are sufficient to launch enrollment next year, begin collecting data, and initiate genetic testing pilot projects.

The US House of Representatives is expected to vote on the sweeping biomedical funding legislation this Wednesday.

Personalized medicine proponents are uncertain where funding, personnel, and priorities will land in a new administration and Congress.

According to multiple sources in Washington, DC, the FDA has been informing stakeholders in policy circles of the decision.

A beta-testing community is providing feedback on the PMI's recruitment efforts, which are slated to kick off in the first quarter of 2017.

The results showed overall high concordance between test results and whether patients received chemotherapy, with some relevant exceptions.

The Nuffield Council report is the first step in addressing ethical considerations of genome editing in human health, food, and the natural environment.

The bill comes amid questions about the efficacy of Epigenomics' Epi proColon, the only blood-based cancer screening test approved in the US.

The bill, which would boost NIH funding among other things, was overwhelmingly approved by the House and cleared a Senate subcommittee, but has stalled amid negotiations over appropriations.

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While gene therapies may have high price tags, they could be cheaper than the cost of managing disease, according to MIT's Technology Review.

Researchers are looking for markers that indicate which cancer patients may respond to immunotherapies, the Associated Press writes.

In Nature this week: paternal age associated with de novo mutations in children, and more.

Nature News writes that researchers are still wrangling over the role of the p-value.