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Celera to Market, Distribute Structural Genomix s ModBase Database

NEW YORK, Oct. 1 - Celera Genomics and Structural Genomix have entered into a multi-year partnership to market and distribute SGX's ModBase database, SGX announced on Monday. 

Terms of the agreement call for Celera, of Rockville, Md., to sell the database as part of its own Discovery System.

"This relationship will allow us to leverage Celera's market presence to increase awareness and use of this unique product,” Mike Grey, SGX's chief business officer, said in a statement. 

Financial terms of the deal were not disclosed.

ModBase contains computationally modeled structures for domains for more than 310,000 proteins, corresponding to 58 percent of all publicly available protein sequences, according to San Diego-based SGX. 

The database, which SGX has exclusively licensed from The Rockefeller University since May, is used primarily in structure-based functional annotation. In addition, knowledge acquired using ModBase, which will be regularly updated with protein sequence structures culled from public databases, can be used to bolster drug-discovery, the company said. 

"A cross-reference of ModBase protein structures with the growing body of gene and protein data in [the Celera Discovery System] should enable our customers to enhance their target and lead discovery process," James Peck, Celera's senior vice president for product development, added in the statement. "We are pleased to make these high quality computational structures a part of our growing protein structure and function knowledge base." 

Separately on Monday, functional genomics firm Sagres Discovery, of Davis, Calif., said it has signed a multi-year subscription agreement with Celera for its CDS product suite. 

Financial terms of the deal were not disclosed.

“Having access to the Celera database dramatically accelerates our discovery process,” Marc Malandro, Sagres Discovery’s vice president of high throughput biology, said in a statement. “This agreement should have a major impact on our efforts to understand the molecular basis of cancer.”