Trana Discovery announced this week that its HIV high-throughput screening assay, designed to identify compounds that inhibit the use of tRNA, which is required for HIV replication, can select compounds with anti-HIV bioactivity.
 
According to the company, disrupting the virus’s ability to use tRNA may represent a novel target for antiretroviral therapy. Trana plans to license the assay to pharma companies that will use it to screen “several hundred thousand, maybe even millions, of compounds.”
 

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Though many details have yet to be worked out, the draft deal for the UK's withdrawal from the EU is giving researchers some hints for what they can expect, Nature News says.

DNA testing has solved a 100-year-old mystery contained in the skull and teeth samples of a now-extinct monkey that once inhabited Jamaica, Gizmodo reports.

As the UN ponders a ban on gene drives, one malaria researcher says there are less dramatic ways to fight the disease in Africa than unleashing GM mosquitoes on a whole continent.

In Nature this week: an improved reference genome of the Aedes aegypti mosquito, genomes of four species of truffles, and more.