Evotec OAI last week reported increased revenues amidst soaring losses for the fourth quarter of 2004. Despite increased revenues over the whole of 2004 for its Evotec Technologies subsidiary, which employs approximately 90 people, is “[as] we have said before ... no longer core to Evotec OAI,” CEO Joern Aldag said in a conference call to investors.

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Researchers have treated an X-linked genetic disease affecting three babies in utero, Stat News reports.

The Associated Press reports that the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention is beefing up sequencing as a tool to investigate foodborne illnesses.

Researchers have sequenced samples from ancient toilets to study past eating habits and health, NPR reports.

In Nature this week: ash dieback disease fungal genome, and more.