Skip to main content
Premium Trial:

Request an Annual Quote

Diversa, Meso Scale Technologies, Picoliter Among Recent Patent Winners

Premium

Cubist Pharmaceuticals has been awarded US Patent No. 6,846,625, “Method for identifying validated target and assay combination for drug development.”

Inventors listed on the patent are Francis Tally, Jianishi Tao, Philip Wendler, Gene Connelly, and Paul Gallant.

According to its abstract, the patent protects methods useful within a larger process for identifying compounds and/or designing further compounds with activity to produce a desired phenotype (for example, growth inhibition) in cells whose target cell component is the subject of certain studies to identify such compounds. The invention employs constructed cells comprising a regulable gene encoding a biomolecule which modulates in vivo the function of a target component of the cell; for example, an enzyme. The process incorporates methods for identifying biomolecules that bind to a chosen target cell component in vitro; and methods for identifying biomolecules that also bind to the chosen target and modulate its function intracellularly, causing a phenotypic effect, the abstract states. The intracellular effect of a biomolecule can be tested in cell culture, or after introduction of the constructed cells into a host mammal in vivo. Compounds identified by this process are candidates for drugs with the desired activity on the cell. Targets for which such compounds can be identified are validated as being essential to a phenotype of the cell.


Diversa Corporation has been awarded US Patent No. 6,846,627, “Screening for novel compounds which regulate biological interactions.”

Jay Short is the inventor listed on the patent.

According to its abstract, the patent protects a process for identifying compounds having a specified activity of interest. The process comprises (1) introducing interacting molecules into a host cell under conditions to generate or repress a detectable signal; and (2) introducing a third compound, or gene(s) encoding a third compound into the host cell from (1); and (3) screening said host cell utilizing a method for detecting the inhibition or enhancement of interaction of proteins or other molecules in an in vivo or in vitro system. Another aspect of the invention provides a process for identifying compounds of interest, in which the process comprises (1) generating one or more expression libraries derived from nucleic acid directly isolated from the environment; and (2) screening said libraries utilizing a method for detecting the inhibition or enhancement of interaction of proteins or other molecules in an in vivo or in vitro system, the abstract states.


Jacob Wohlstadter, president and CEO of MesoScale Technologies, has been awarded US Patent No. 6,846,628, “Selection methods.”

According to its abstract, the patent protects a rational method for obtaining a novel molecule capable of a desired interaction with a substrate of interest. The method comprises selecting hosts or replicators which encode said novel molecules based upon cell or replicator growth caused by the desired interaction of the novel molecule and a selection molecule expressed by said host, the abstract states.


Meso Scale Technologies has been awarded US Patent No. 6,846,629, “Methods and apparatus for improved luminescence assays using microparticles.

Inventors listed on the patent are George Sigal, Jacob Wohlstadter, Satyanarayana Gudibande, Mark Martin, and James Wilbur.

According to its abstract, the patent protects microparticles comprising a core, and electrochemiluminescent moieties within the core, and methods of using the same in assays.


The American National Red Cross, the US Department of Health, and the MUSC Foundation for Research Development have been awarded US Patent No. 6,846,636, “Methods and compositions for HDL holoparticle uptake receptor.”

Inventors listed on the patent are William Argraves, Samar Hammad, Steingrimur Stefansson, Bryan Brewer, and Alan Remaley.

According to its abstract, the patent protects an isolated mammalian receptor that specifically binds a high-density lipoprotein holoparticle, comprising a subunit of approximately 45- to 600-kilodalton molecular weight, and one or more subunits selected from the group consisting of subunits of approximately 40- to 50-kilodalton, 120-kilodalton, and 400-kilodalton molecular weight. In addition, the patent protects a method of screening a substance for the ability to modulate the HDL holoparticle binding and/or internalization activity of said receptor, comprising: (1) contacting the substance with a cell producing a functional HDL receptor; and (2) assaying the cell for a modulation of the HDL holoparticle binding and/or internalization activity of the receptor, the abstract states.


AstraZeneca has been awarded US Patent No. 6,846,668, “Microfabricated cell injector.”

Inventors listed on the patent are Andrew Garman, David Scanlon, John Dodgson, John Shaw, David Brennan, Anthony Corless, and Christopher Turner.

According to its abstract, the patent protects a microfabricated cell injector having an injection wall and a cell injection needle projecting from the wall for piercing cells suspended in a fluid. The needle is held within a housing defined by the internal surfaces of the microfabricated cell injector. The housing has an inlet for suspended cells to enter and an outlet for cells to exit via the cell injection needle. A cell propulsion device is provided for impelling cells towards the needle such that, in use, cells suspended in the fluid are impelled towards the injection wall by the injection needle, the abstract states.


Picoliter (now Labcyte) has been awarded US Patent No. 6,849,423, “Focused acoustics for detection and sorting of fluid volumes.”

Inventors listed on the patent are Mitchell Mutz, Richard Ellson, and David Soong-Hua Lee.

According to its abstract, the patent protects a method for acoustically ejecting from a channel or other container a plurality of fluid droplets, each of which contains one or more particles or other localized volumes. The localized volumes, which can be living cells, are ejected towards sites on a substrate surface, a container, or a channel, the abstract states. An integrated cell-sorting and -arraying system is also provided that is capable of sorting based upon cellular properties by the selective ejection of cells from a carrier fluid. The cells can be ejected with adjustable velocity and trajectory. The ejected cells can be directed to form an array, wherein each site of the array can contain a single cell. Additionally provided is a method of forming arrays of single live cells more efficiently, rapidly, flexibly, and economically than by other cell array approaches. This method permits efficient, continuous, and simultaneous sorting of cells based upon the quantitative or semiquantitative measurement of cellular properties, and also permits non-binary or severally branched decision making, the abstract states. The patent also protects an integrated system, which includes a processor, and methods for the detection, selection, and ejection of selected particles or circumscribed volumes, such as live cells, from a continuous stream of fluid-suspended particles or other circumscribed volumes flowing in channels.


The General Hospital Corporation has been awarded US Patent No. 6,849,424, “Three-dimensional cell growth assay.”

Inventors listed on the patent are Thomas Deisboeck, Antonio Chiocca, and John Wright.

According to its abstract, the patent protects devices and methods for growing cells in vitro in an enclosed device that allows for a three-dimensional measurement over time of both their proliferative and/or invasive properties. By growing the cells in an enclosed matrix that resembles the environment that the cells confront in vivo, the cells can divide, invade, and form branched networks as they do in living tissue, e.g., in an individual, the abstract states. The devices of the invention include a test chamber in which cells, e.g., tumor cells, are placed and permitted to divide and/or invade. Cells can be placed within an insert within a chamber of the device. A delivery chamber that connects to the test chamber enables the delivery of agents that can be studied, e.g., for their therapeutic potential. The assay devices of the invention can be used as model systems to study cancer biology and to evaluate the efficacy of anti-cancer therapeutics, the abstract states.


New York University has been awarded US Patent No. 6,849,455, “Enhanced recovery of transformed cells.”

Renata Maas is the inventor listed on the patent.

According to its abstract, the patent protects a method by which DNA is efficiently transformed into a host by electroporation in the presence of a methylation package, which greatly improves the efficiency of the transformation. The methylation package comprises a source of cysteine, such as cysteine, homocysteine, or glutathione, with optional iron and magnesium ions, the abstract states.

The Scan

Two J&J Doses

Johnson & Johnson says two doses of its SARS-CoV-2 vaccine provides increased protection against symptomatic COVID-19, CNN reports.

Pfizer-BioNTech Vaccine Response in Kids

The Pfizer-BioNTech SARS-CoV-2 vaccine in a lower-dose format appears to generate an immune response among children, according to the Washington Post.

Chicken Changes to Prevent Disease

The Guardian writes that researchers are looking at gene editing chickens to help prevent future pandemics.

PNAS Papers on Siberian Dog Ancestry, Insect Reproduction, Hippocampal Neurogenesis

In PNAS this week: ancestry and admixture among Siberian dogs, hormone role in fruit fly reproduction, and more.