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More women are earning science and engineering degrees, but still do not make up the same percentage of the workforce.

More PhD Slots

University of California, San Diego, may add a number of new PhD students, especially in science and engineering.

On the List

An anonymous scientist writes in The Guardian about gender bias.

Stress, What Stress?

A top 10 list at Forbes says that university professor is one of the least stressful jobs for 2013.

Reaching Out

A Bristol researcher argues that researchers should get involved in outreach to bolster their own careers and to inspire others.

Scientist and comedian Adam Ruben discusses how scientists' hobbies are perceived.

More than 60 percent of people who earned a science and engineering PhD in 2011 had a job or postdoc lined up for after graduation.

NIGMS answers common questions about the career development awards that it supports.

The Crossroads

A blogger offers a guide for determining whether grad school is right for you.

A new report finds that, at higher levels, men outnumber women at Canadian universities.

Giving a Good Talk

To persuade, talks should disarm listeners and tell a story.

Female Mentors Needed

A scientist writes that more female scientists should consider being mentors.

Concentrated Learning

The UK shifts toward funding doctoral training programs at a limited number of institutions.

The Gap

Women, even in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics fields, are paid less than their male counterparts.

Sally Rockey clears up confusion regarding what postdoc activities can be supported by US National Institutes of Health grants.

There are more women being published, but they are less likely to have a senior-author slot.

The American College of Medical Genetics and Genomics is turning to YouTube to drum up interest in medical genetics careers.

The Falling Curtain

Bias, not just work-life balance, keeps women from pursuing careers in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics.

Bloggers at National Institute of General Medical Sciences discuss how the change in the fiscal year affects NIGMS grants.

Tips for Keeping Up

Bitesize Bio offers advice on how to keep up with your field when you are out of a job.

A series of editorials in The New York Times discusses gender imbalance in the sciences.

Guidelines and other criteria can help to quell disagreements over who should be a paper's author.

Former NIGMS Director Jeremy Berg shares some advice on obtaining NIH grants.

A program aims to mentor women in college interested in careers in science, technology, engineering, and math.

'Bring Some Data'

A blogger has advice for graduate students doing lab rotations.

Pages

New US Department of Commerce rules will affect supercomputing in China, according to the Wall Street Journal.

A new analysis finds that it will be more than a century until female computer scientists publish at the same rate as their male counterparts, ScienceInsider reports.

Broad Institute researchers describe an approach they've dubbed "DNA microscopy."

In PLOS this week: epigenetic changes following hepatitis C virus treatment, metagenomic analysis of Ugandan children with febrile illness, and more.