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WASHINGTON, DC (GenomeWeb) – Researchers from Johns Hopkins University this week described the methodology they have developed for subduing sequencing errors in order to allow accurate detection and characterization of mutations at very low frequencies in circulating cell-free DNA.

The approach, called targeted error correction sequencing, or TEC-Seq, involves in-solution capture of a targeted panel of tumor-related genes and exceedingly deep sequencing — as much as 30,000x — of cell-free DNA fragments.

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