WASHINGTON, DC (GenomeWeb) – Researchers from Johns Hopkins University this week described the methodology they have developed for subduing sequencing errors in order to allow accurate detection and characterization of mutations at very low frequencies in circulating cell-free DNA.

The approach, called targeted error correction sequencing, or TEC-Seq, involves in-solution capture of a targeted panel of tumor-related genes and exceedingly deep sequencing — as much as 30,000x — of cell-free DNA fragments.

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Labs in the US and South Korea are hoping to bring the woolly mammoth back from beyond extinction, Newsweek writes.

Geneticist Adam Rutherford speaks with National Geographic about paleogenetics, race, and more.

Researchers link genetic links between education and smoking and longevity.

In PNAS this week: influence of gene environment interactions on polygenic traits, epigenetic features affecting fruit fly foraging, and more.

Nov
02
Sponsored by
Qiagen

This webinar will discuss the benefits of using unique molecular indices to overcome some challenges associated with next-generation sequencing panels.

Dec
05
Sponsored by
Agilent Technologies

This webinar will discuss a molecular barcode-based error correction method that enables combined mutation detection and DNA copy number profiling through circulating tumor DNA sequencing.