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Johns Hopkins Lands $30M for Personalized Cancer Center

NEW YORK (GenomeWeb News) – The Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center will use a $30 million donation from the Commonwealth Foundation for Cancer Research to fund a new center that will focus on genomics and personalized cancer medicine research.

Johns Hopkins will use the funding from the Richmond, Va.-based foundation to support the Center for Personalized Cancer Medicine, which initially will undertake three pilot projects focused on DNA mutations inside cells and epigenetic alterations.

The researchers at the new center, which began operations last month, will study genomic and epigenomic factors that affect leukemia and lung cancer patients' responses to treatment and develop tests for early detection of various types of cancer. The long-term aim will be for these genetic discoveries to inform the development of individualized immunotherapies such as cancer vaccines and pharmacogenomics-based treatment tools.

The Commonwealth Foundation also supports research at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, MD Anderson Cancer Center, the University of Virginia Cancer Center, and Virginia Commonwealth University's Massey Cancer Center.

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