NEW YORK (GenomeWeb) – Early genetic changes can be used to identify individuals who are at an increased risk of developing acute myeloid leukemia, according to a new study.

More than 19,500 people will be diagnosed with AML this year in the US, according to the National Cancer Institute. Patients typically exhibit few symptoms before the disease's abrupt onset, but an international team of researchers sought to identify those at increased risk.

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Sometimes genetic tests give inconclusive results and provide little reassurance to patients, the Associated Press reports.

Vox wonders whether gene-editing crops will be viewed similarly as genetically modified organisms of if people will give them a try.

In Science this week: research regulation and reporting requirement reform, and more.

With H3Africa, Charles Rotimi has been working to bolster the representation of African participants and African researchers in genomics, Newsweek reports.

Jul
24
Sponsored by
Qiagen

In this webinar, Dr. Fergus Couch from the Mayo Clinic will present data from a large study that used a targeted sequencing panel to determine pancreatic cancer risk associated with inherited mutations in several cancer predisposition genes.

Aug
07
Sponsored by
Qiagen

This webinar will present the results of an evaluation of a web-based variant interpretation software system for clinical next-generation sequencing.

Aug
09
Sponsored by
Agena Bioscience

In this two-part webinar, Dr. Elin Gray, from Edith Cowan University, and Ms. Weiwei Zhao, from Kingmed diagnostic, will compare the highly sensitive, multiplexed UltraSEEK technology, on the MassARRAY system, to digital droplet PCR (ddPCR) results on melanoma and non-small cell lung carcinoma samples.

Aug
15
Sponsored by
Swift Biosciences

This webinar will discuss the Cancer Avatar Project at the California Pacific Medical Center Research Institute (CPMCRI) and the efforts to overcome complexity of tumor profiling using the Accel-Amplicon sequencing workflow from Swift Biosciences.