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NEW YORK – The use of CRISPR screens in cancer research is on the rise as investigators learn to use the technology to efficiently interrogate the genome to search for new druggable targets.

During the second virtual session of the American Association for Cancer Research's annual meeting on Monday, University of California, San Francisco researcher Alex Marson and Stanford University's Michael Bassik described the ways they're each using CRISPR as a tool to advance their research of how cancer behaves and how it can be treated.

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