technology commercialization

After three years of work, the EXaCT-1 exome cancer test has become part of clinical cancer care at NewYork-Presbyterian, but developers have higher ambitions.

The company plans to launch the system this summer in Europe, aiming to broaden cell-free DNA screening for trisomy 21, 18, and 13.

The company said that the funds will allow it to take its ReadyPlex rapid blood group genotyping assays into clinical trials and commercialization.

CEO Brad Gray said the firm has outgrown its existing sales model and will be looking to add both new sales leadership and new consumables sales roles.

SMiLE-seq combines antibody arrays, mechanical trapping, and next-generation sequencing readouts to provide a new platform for characterizing DNA-protein interactions.

The funding will support manufacturing of the firm's Idylla PCR-based diagnostics platform and worker training at its Mechelen, Belgium facility.

Frameshift plans to commercialize two applications: one for data quality control and a second for identifying mutations in rare and Mendelian disorders.

Its first client, Haystack Bio, will use Genecloud to analyze and store single-cell genomics data for a proprietary platform it is developing for the immunotherapy market.

The partners have integrated WashU's VarScan with Appistry's GenomePilot, which provides preconfigured workflows for clinical NGS.

DiaGenomi offers a number of tests that combine DNA analysis with information about lifestyle and medical results to provide disease risk assessments.

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Lawmakers have asked four direct-to-consumer genetic testing companies to explain their privacy policies and security measures, according to Stat News.

The Trump Administration has proposed a plan to reorganize the federal government, the Washington Post reports.

In Science this week: genetic overlap among many psychiatric disorders, and more.

The Economist writes that an increasing number of scientific journals don't do peer review.