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stock split

The company stock will now trade on a split-adjusted basis on the Nasdaq after reducing its number of shares from 200 million to 26.7 million. 

The company's stock will now trade on a split-adjusted basis on the Nasdaq after authorization for the split was approved by stockholders.

The company recently changed its name from Interpace Diagnostics as it expands its focus to include drug discovery and development services.

The disclosure comes less than a week after the company said that it was out of compliance with the Nasdaq's minimum shareholder equity requirement.

The cancer diagnostics developer said it was undertaking the reverse stock split in order to meet the Nasdaq's $1 minimum bid price requirement.

The company is taking the step to continue listing its shares on the Nasdaq, which had warned OpGen that did not meet a listing requirement calling for a minimum bid price of $1 per share. 

OpGen had previously been warned by Nasdaq that it failed to meet listing requirements. Last week, the firm was told that it was ineligible for an extension to regain compliance.

The one-for-30 reverse split is intended to increase the price of the company's stock, enabling it to satisfy the Nasdaq's initial listing requirements.

The move is designed to help Rosetta regain compliance with the Nasdaq's $1 minimum bid requirement for continued listing.

Interpace hopes to keep its stock listed on the Nasdaq as a result of the reverse split. 

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