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stimulus funding

The NIH center has granted out its ARRA funding for 146 projects that will update, renovate, and build biomedical research labs in 44 states.

The company will collaborate with the University of Oregon to develop companion diagnostic tests to identify adverse effects on mitochondria from antiviral drugs.

The Rutgers University Cell and DNA Repository will use the NCRR Recovery Act funds to renovate and expand its facilities.

VUMC says the $8.6 million, two-year federal stimulus grant it recently won toward a consolidation and expansion of a collaborative shared resource will enable the institution to accommodate new genomics tools and carry out its research more efficiently.

After spending $4.6 billion in 2009 in stimulus funding for scientific research, NIH still has much left in the bank for infrastructure, research, and facilities.

The Genome Center will double the size of its data center to 32,000 square feet and increase its computer data storage capacity from the current 5 petabytes.

The ARRA-funded research seeks molecular controls for cancer cells' metabolic changes that enable them to survive stress.

The revenue from the stimulus orders surpasses a $50 million estimate provided by the firm just a few months ago.

Aimed at tackling specific challenges, the Recovery Act awards will support synthetic biology, epigenetics, gene expression, and other studies.

The UT Health Sciences Center will use $26 million to study cardiovascular risks and $3 million for arthritis risk genes.

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According to New Scientist, GEDmatch changed its terms and conditions over the weekend to opt its users out of law enforcement searches.

A twin study uncovers evidence that genes may influence whether someone gets a dog, Martha Stewart reports.

The Atlantic looks into time spent pursuing gene leads generated through candidate gene studies.

In PNAS this week: Cdx2 cells can help regenerate heart tissue in mice following a heart attack, PIWI-interacting small RNA levels in human cancer, and more.