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NEW YORK (GenomeWeb News) – California will once again consider legislation that would prohibit the unauthorized collection of a person's genetic information.

This article has been updated to clarify comments from Anya Prince of the Cancer Legal Resource Center. The article inaccurately cited Prince as stating that some states mandate coverage for BRCA testing.

NEW YORK (GenomeWeb News) – California lawmakers are considering a new proposal that would address concerns about keeping genetic information private by making it illegal to analyze, share, or store an individual's genetic information without that person's written consent.

The California State Senate has passed a bill that would provide broader protections from genetic discrimination than does the Genetic Information Nondiscrimination Act (GINA) of 2008.

The Massachusetts Genetic Bill of Rights in the state legislature proposes more protections and privacy for individual genetic information and materials.

According to unofficial results, the Third Frontier extension passed by a 62-38 percent margin, benefiting from a consensus of support among life sciences leaders, business leaders, and government officials from both political parties.

The referendum, known as State Issue 1, would extend four years a key funding source over the past decade for many of the Buckeye State's research institutions and partners in recruiting researchers, building facilities, and pursuing research.

The money is part of the $22 million committed by the state in return for the nonprofit research and technology development institute locating its recently-opened Center for Advanced Drug Research, or CADRE, in Harrisonburg, Va.

Life sciences leaders, led by the Washington Biotechnology and Biomedical Association, successfully lobbied for the exemption by emphasizing the effect the higher tax would have on specific research institutions and companies.

Leroy Hood called the bill short-sighted and said that over the long-term it could potentially reduce the attractiveness of starting up companies in the Seattle area.

Retraction Watch reports that a paper was pulled because it refers to a gene that doesn't exist in mice.

Researchers were able to generate fertilized northern white rhinoceros eggs, according to Mashable.

Former Orig3n employees raise concerns about its testing at Bloomberg Businessweek.

In PLOS this week: microRNA expression changes in hepatocellular carcinoma, real-time PCR-based approach for diagnosing schistosomiasis, and more.