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SBIR grant

The companies are combining GMSbiotech's proprietary microarray platform with soluble human leukocyte antigen proteins produced by Pure Protein.

The SBIR grant could be worth as much as $2.3 million and will help PapGene develop and commercialize its proprietary ovarian and endometrial cancer detection test.

The firm will use the award to develop silica nanomaterial for use with many sample types, including blood, cultured cells, and pathogens.

The company believes it can make oligonucleotide synthesis faster and cheaper than currently available methods, and plans to launch a platform in the next year.

The company is developing a cloud-based platform for the detection, quantification, and interpretation of alternative splicing variation from NGS data.

The technology will allow scientists or clinicians to load crude blood sample and generate DNA sequencing libraries in a fully automated workflow.

The company is developing multiplexed and reverse-phase array versions of its protein phosphorylation-detection technology.

The company aims to use the funding to further optimize the technology and support an ongoing early-access program with beta testers.

The company said the library will be made freely available to academic and non-profit investigators through the DECIPHER Project.

The company aims to launch the qPCR-based test in sub-Saharan Africa.

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Novavax has begun a phase III trial of its SARS-CoV-2 vaccine, according to the New York Times.

Vox reports that the Trump Administration may limit student visas for individuals from some countries to two years.

The governor of New York says the state will conduct its own review of any SARS-CoV-2 vaccine, NPR reports.

This week in Science: Neanderthal Y chromosomes replaced by Homo sapiens Y chromosomes, and more.