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peer-reviewed publication

Just Skip that Step

The Economist writes that an increasing number of scientific journals don't do peer review.

Magdalena Skipper, the incoming editor-in-chief of Nature, speaks with NPR's Weekend Edition Sunday.

What happens to scientific papers when certain journals are no longer published? Some scientists are trying to make sure they don't disappear forever.

Talk It Up on Twitter

An analysis appearing in PeerJ finds that social media mentions of a paper may lead to increased citations.

The US National Institutes of Health has decided to discontinue PubMed Commons because of low uptake.

Keep It Quality

The National Institutes of Health's Office of Extramural Research expands on its recent call for researchers to avoid publishing in problematic journals at Retraction Watch.

A scientific publishing expert calls for peer reviews to be made public alongside the papers they critique, according to Retraction Watch.

According to Nature News, the African Academy of Sciences is launching an open-access publishing platform next year.

For a Longer CV

The New York Times reports that some academics publish in predatory journals to boost their publication list.

Even when given the option, not too many authors choose double-blinded peer-review for their manuscripts, ScienceInsider reports.

Pages

The Washington Post reports on researchers' efforts to determine the effect of an increasingly common SARS-CoV-2 mutation.

Florida Politics reports Florida's law barring life, long-term care, and disability insurers from using genetic information in coverage decisions went into effect at the beginning of July.

A new analysis finds a link between popular media coverage of a scientific study and how often that paper is cited.

In Nature this week: CRISPR approaches to editing plant genomes, way to speed up DNA-PAINT, and more.