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The Washington Post reports that a Russian Academy of Sciences commission has led to the retraction of hundreds of scientific papers.

The study, led by NYU researchers, provides a mathematical framework to find gene sets identifiable via both methods, revealing tissue architecture.

The New York Times reports academic researchers often work right through the holidays and over the weekends.

A Good Spin

A new analysis in The BMJ finds that male authors are more likely to use terms like "novel," "unique," or "unprecedented" when describing their work, which leads to more citations.

The new method, called sci-Plex, combines nuclear hashing and improved single-cell combinatorial indexing RNA-seq to profile the transcriptional response of single cells.

CUTseq uses enzyme-based fragmentation and in vitro transcription to barcode DNA, saving money when preparing 1,000 samples or more.

The president of Nankai University is embroiled in a data manipulation scandal, the South China Morning Post reports.

Nature News reports that additional South Korean researchers have included the names of children on scientific papers when they did not contribute to the work.

Nature News writes that women in chemistry are less likely to have their manuscripts accepted for publication.

Retraction Watch reports that a series of tweets led to expression of concern for a PLOS Genetics paper, a move the paper's authors disagree with.

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The Los Angeles Times reports that a case of the novel coronavirus making people ill in China has been reported in the US. 

A bipartisan group of senators has introduced a bill seeking increased funding for certain fields, including synthetic biology, ScienceInsider reports. 

Discover magazine writes that paleoproteomics is increasing being used in archaeology, paleoanthropology, and paleontology, including a recent study of a 6,000-year-old ring. 

In Nucleic Acids Research this week: mutagenic effects of ultraviolet "A" light, post-transcription effects of synonymous mutations, and more.