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Both studies emerged from the ongoing Human Cell Atlas project and could help scientists decide on the best approaches to use in various contexts.

After comparing manual methods with the firm's pcr.ai tool in more than 20,000 cases, they found that the use of AI improved test accuracy and reliability.

A study group eager to learn about genetic testing online was not won over by videos produced by academics without communication expertise.

The ongoing effort — called Your DNA, Your Say — based its results on responses from nearly 9,000 people from the US, UK, Canada, and Australia.

Researchers focused on using existing computational methods to fill in gaps in the human microbiome without reference genomes.

The Genes for Good Project has engaged 80,000 Facebook users via its online application and genotyped 27,000 people to date.

The test relies on a signature that Almac developed for stratifying breast cancer patients, but which, as the researchers showed, can be used in other cancers as well.

Informaticians at Spain's National Cancer Research Centre develop a methodology for evaluating likely drug efficacy based on specific patient genotypes.

The firm hopes the effort, recently described in the journal Oncotarget, will spur adoption of its testing services by oncologists, particularly in Europe, where it is determined to become a market leader.

The effort, which relied on Oxford BioDynamics' EpiSwitch platform, resulted in an assay that researchers believe could be developed into a test to guide therapy selection for patients.

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New analyses indicate female researchers are publishing less during the coronavirus pandemic than male researchers, according to Nature News.

A study suggests people with the ApoE e4 genotype may be more likely to have severe COVID-19 than those with other genotypes, the Guardian says.

Direct-to-consumer genetic testing companies are searching for a genetic reason for why some people, but not others, become gravely ill with COVID-19, the Detroit Free Press reports.

In PNAS this week: forward genetics-base analysis of retinal development, interactions of T cell receptors with neoantigens in colorectal cancer, and more.