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Middle East

Crusader bones, Lebanon

Sequence data for nine Crusaders buried in Lebanon identified individuals with European, Near Eastern, or mixed ancestry, but no lasting genetic effect on the wider population.

In a study of microbial genome data, researchers noted that many horizontal gene transfer events appeared to occur between different sites within the human body.

Neanderthals and woolly mammoths may have harbored similar genetic adaptations to the cold, according to the Jerusalem Post.

In PLOS this week: 'reverse genome-wide association study' method; genetic links between Familial Mediterranean Fever and ankylosing spondylitis; and more.

With gut metagenomic sequences from two population cohorts, investigators identified associations between health traits and microbial structural variants.

A WHO panel is calling for a global registry of human germline gene-editing projects, according to Stat News.

The deal will enable the Australian firm to distribute its diagnostic tests in the United Arab Emirates, Saudi Arabia, Bahrain, Qatar, and Oman.

Eighteen researchers call for a temporary stop to all clinical uses of human germline editing in a piece appearing in Nature.

Bar-Ilan University researchers find that sleeping could help fix DNA damage that accumulates during the day in neurons, according to the Guardian.

In PLOS this week: potential cystic fibrosis modifiers, potential kidney cancer survival signature, and more.

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The Washington Post reports that the CDC's SARS-CoV-2 test issues reflect earlier ones it had with Zika virus testing.

Researchers traced a gene cluster linked to COVID-19 severity to Neanderthals, the New York Times reports.

NPR writes that even with thousands of new COVID-19 papers, each should be evaluated based on its own quality.

In PNAS this week: soil bacteria-derived small molecules affect centrosomal protein, microfluidics approach for capturing circulating tumor cells, and more.