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mergers & acquisitions

Thomas Weisel Partners called Thermo Fisher's planned $260 million acquisition of Fermentas a "synergistic tuck-in deal" that "bolsters Thermo's capabilities in the high-growth PCR market."

Based in Ontario with principal operations in Lithuania, Fermentas offers reagents for nucleic acid and protein purification, restriction and modifying enzymes, and various PCR products.

ZyGem's acquisition of MicroLab Diagnostics, announced this week, is expected to accelerate the company's transformation from a provider of DNA extraction products to a purveyor of fully integrated DNA-testing platforms for the forensics, biodefense, and eventually clinical diagnostics markets.

The company plans to offer an integration of Zygem's DNA extraction technologies with MicroLab's microfluidic chip tools for a wide range of testing applications.

Agilent completed the $1.5 billion deal after receiving confirmation from regulatory bodies that it had met the conditions required for the acquisition.

The $1.5 billion acquisition was announced almost a year ago, but its completion has been held up by regulatory bodies in the US and EU.

The firm posted double-digit growth across all three of its divisions, while its bottom line was aided by the sale of the mass spectrometry division. It also announced the acquisition of Stokes Bio.

The acquisition of the Pittsburgh-based cancer testing company will bolster ExonHit’s molecular diagnostic position and its US presence.

The review period for the $7.2 billion deal passed without a request from US authorities for additional information.

The acquisition combines Molecular Transfer's offerings for transfection with GlobalStem's stem cell research tools and reagents.

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New analyses indicate female researchers are publishing less during the coronavirus pandemic than male researchers, according to Nature News.

A study suggests people with the ApoE e4 genotype may be more likely to have severe COVID-19 than those with other genotypes, the Guardian says.

Direct-to-consumer genetic testing companies are searching for a genetic reason for why some people, but not others, become gravely ill with COVID-19, the Detroit Free Press reports.

In PNAS this week: forward genetics-base analysis of retinal development, interactions of T cell receptors with neoantigens in colorectal cancer, and more.