licensing agreement | GenomeWeb

licensing agreement

The company also extended its existing licensing agreement with Genalice, signed in 2013, to improve plant DNA analysis.

The firm has secured rights to use CRISPR in cell lines for biomanufacturing and will work with Solentim to increase editing throughput while decreasing costs.

CRISPR/Cpf1 can serve as an alternative or even complementary genome editing technology to CRISPR/Cas9, which Monsanto has also licensed from the Broad.

The licenses cover IP related to a new CRISPR technology known as Cpf1, advanced forms of Cas9, and additional Cas9-based genome editing technologies.

The University of California, University of Vienna, and researcher Emmanuelle Charpentier, as well as their commercial partners, are linked by the agreement.

The firm is developing a sepsis and SIRS diagnostic that combines its own molecule counting technology with Thermo Fisher's procalcitonin assay. 

The license pooling firm announced it will try to standardize CRISPR licenses and enable one-stop shopping for the genome engineering technology.

The firms have eliminated several terms of their original deal and have cross-licensed IP to allow Med BioGene to license Gene FX Lung to other firms. 

Knudra, a model organism engineering firm, will use CRISPR to edit C. elegans and zebrafish genomes for its pharma and biotech customers.

Industrial biotech firm Evolva now has the rights to use CRISPR/Cas9 to engineer yeast and fungi that make compounds like stevia and resveratrol.

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