licensing agreement | GenomeWeb

licensing agreement

The chemical conglomerate is the second firm to license CRISPR/Cas9 from the Broad after Monsanto.

The firm said that the technologies it has licensed improve PCR and RT-PCR amplification of DNA and RNA.

The Croatan algorithm uses the random forest machine learning method to evaluate guide RNAs for use in CRISPR knockout experiments.

The firm will use MaxCyte's cell transfection platform to edit hematopoietic stem cells with CRISPR/Cas9 in hemoglobinopathy and SCID.

Laboratoire Cerba was granted the right to develop a tumor expression test based on IntegraGen's proprietary microRNA biomarker.

The technologies monitor patient response to immunotherapies. 

Both companies plan to offer the test to researchers and clinicians to help better determine when a patient can be diagnosed with an infectious disease.

The company also extended its existing licensing agreement with Genalice, signed in 2013, to improve plant DNA analysis.

The firm has secured rights to use CRISPR in cell lines for biomanufacturing and will work with Solentim to increase editing throughput while decreasing costs.

CRISPR/Cpf1 can serve as an alternative or even complementary genome editing technology to CRISPR/Cas9, which Monsanto has also licensed from the Broad.

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An opinion piece in the New York Times urges lawmakers to keep genetic protections in place.

Research funding in Canada is to remain mostly the same, ScienceInsider reports.

In Science this week: random DNA replication errors play role in cancer, and more.

The Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation embarks on an open-access publishing path.