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Retraction Watch reports on the latest goings-on with  Carlo Croce's lawsuit against Ohio State University.

The lawsuit, filed on the eve of 10x's IPO, alleges that 10x's new Next GEM microfluidic chips infringe a patent exclusively licensed to Bio-Rad.

The UK-based sequencing technology firm continues to seek invalidation of PacBio's patents, despite unsuccessful earlier efforts.

The South San Francisco, California cellular analysis firm alleges IonPath has infringed two patents and has been intereferening in its contracts.

The victory for the sequencing giant is just the latest in a string of favorable decisions before the US Patent Trial and Appeals Board.

In response to BD's patent suit, 10x alleged BD's single-cell products infringe its own patents. 10x also asked the judge to dismiss BD's lawsuit.

The index, which slightly underperformed the Dow Jones, had a smaller loss in August than in the previous month.

Spurred to develop new microfluidic chip technology, 10x told customers not to worry about the transition but told a court there would be "guaranteed hitches."

The case, which was originally being fought between Enzo and Hologic, was decided in favor of Becton Dickinson, Hologic's co-plaintiff.

In addition to the $24 million jury verdict, 10x must pay an additional $8.3 million in damages and $2.2 million in interest. It has appealed the case.

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A Minnesota toddler given a gene therapy to treat her spinal muscular atrophy is now walking, according to Newsweek.

NBC Bay Area reports a California lab has been certified to conduct forensic mitochondrial DNA sequencing.

The New York Times reports on how environmental DNA sampling could monitor endangered species.

In Cell this week: proteomic, genomic, and transcriptomic analysis of endometrial cancer; deep neural network learning-based approach to antibiotic discovery; and more.