IP/patents

Enzo Biochem, Enzo Life Sciences, and Yale University had originally brought the suit against Life Technologies, now part of Thermo Fisher, in 2004.

Population Genetics was formed to commercialize the IP portfolio of Sydney Brenner focused on high sensitivity and high specificity NGS detection.

Enzo's patent relates to modified nucleotides for diagnostic and therapeutic applications, and is central to separate ongoing lawsuits with diagnostic developers.

In a recent regulatory filing, Thermo disclosed that it acquired Core Informatics for $94 million and Finesse Solutions for $220 million.

The IP stems from the work of Anjana Rao, who identified 5-hydroxymethylcytosine (5hmC) as a cancer diagnostic biomarker.

PacBio alleged in its suit that Oxford Nanopore is infringing on a patent it holds related to single-molecule nanopore sequencing.  

Agilent filed a lawsuit against Twist nearly a year ago, alleging that Twist Cofounder and CEO Emily LeProust had stolen DNA oligonucleotide synthesis technology. 

The licenses cover IP related to a new CRISPR technology known as Cpf1, advanced forms of Cas9, and additional Cas9-based genome editing technologies.

The University of California, University of Vienna, and researcher Emmanuelle Charpentier, as well as their commercial partners, are linked by the agreement.

The GeneReader will feature a new sequencing chemistry that Qiagen believes circumnavigates an ongoing IP dispute with Illumina and provides enhanced performance.

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Researchers find that a personalized medicine approach could help people who experience pain while taking statins, New Scientist reports.

US National Science Foundation is continuing its responsible research conduct training policy despite its flaws, ScienceInsider reports.

A CRISPR-themed meeting explored how the tool could and should be used, Wired reports.

In Science this week: database of proteins' effects on cancer, targeted error correction sequencing, and more.