GINA

With recent challenges to the US Affordable Care Act, NPR looks into whether there are any ramifications for genetic privacy.

Denied Requests

CBS Philly reports that people who have undergone genetic testing can be denied life insurance.

More, Not Less

The Brown Political Review argues that the government should enhance protections against genetic discrimination.

Genetic counselors and patient advocates say more people are refusing genetic testing because they're uncertain of how it will impact their insurance.

Pre-Existing Genes

Wired writes that new the US healthcare bill could led people to be denied insurance coverage because of pre-existing conditions written in their genes.

Any short-term gains the bill may have on encouraging healthier lifestyles wouldn’t be worth the crippling effects it could have on the genomics field, leaders in the space said.

Some 50 groups have signed a letter expressing strong opposition to a bill that would allow workplace wellness programs to collect employees' genetic information.

EEOC final rules provide employers clarity on wellness programs, but they may confuse the public about genetic privacy and anti-discrimination laws, some groups said.

According to ASHG, the final rules, issued this week, will significantly weaken patient privacy protections under ADA and GINA.

The Genetic Research Privacy Protection Act would ensure that federally funded researchers can't reveal genetic data that can identify study participants.

Pages

NPR reports that researchers in Italy are testing a gene drive aimed at controlling mosquito populations.

Researchers may experience the effects of the government shutdown for a while, the Los Angeles Times reports.

A new study finds that the majority of patients at a Tijuana clinic received a diagnosis after first-line genome sequencing, the San Diego Union-Tribune reports.

In Genome Biology this week: post-transcriptional modification-based stratification of glioblastoma, single-cell analysis of gene expression and methylation in human iPSCs, and more.